http://www.arapaholegends.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/BuffaloDance.mp3 “Get ready,” her husband called out to the tribe. “Now we are ready to go around the banuxta’wu!” So goes out the call to the women at the Arapaho camp that a Buffalo Lodge is being called together. Once her husband had rode around the camp crying out his message, he would have returned to his wife who had made the vow to hold the lodge. Together, they then went around the camp-circle from left to right, entering each tipi and encouraging the women to join her in the ceremony. In her hands, the pledger held a pipe that would bind those who touched it to her vow. It was actually difficult to persuade the women to join her because the dancers must make payments during the course of the ceremony. Those that agree to dance, accompanied the pledger and her husband with their own husbands as they continued to visit each tipi, looking for more dancers. The Buffalo Lodge was for all women, married and not, above the age of 15. Certain men were allowed to assist during the ceremonies and a medicine man was in charge but, for the most part, this lodge and it’s associated ceremonies were strictly for the women. According to the historian Kroeber, it was mostly young women who agreed to join the dance, which involved four days of dancing and racing. Once the dancers were gathered, a lodge was put up in the center of the camp-circle made of seven tent poles tied together with a rope of buffalo skin. A painted red digging stick was placed across the poles near the top and the other tent poles rested against this brace. Two poles were painted black and placed at the northeast and southwest to represent night and two poles were painted red and placed at the northwest and southeast to represent day. Three to four skin tent coverings were used to cover the poles with the entrance facing the east. The people at the camp contributed all the materials for the lodge. The pledger of the dance was the highest ranked of the dancers and known as the “white woman”. She was painted white to represent a bull buffalo. Her headdress fell well beneath her shoulders and the white weasel skin hide was covered with either white swan feathers or goose down. Second in rank was the “owner-of-the-tent-poles” who represented an old bull leading the herd. She wore a buffalo cap headdress painted white with decorated horns. The cap covered her forehead and fell below her neck. The third rank were known as “red-stand” and the fourth rank, as the “white-stand”. Both these ranks wore leather headbands painted either red...